What is the meaning of the word "mystery" in Matthew's gospel?

The word "mystery" appears several times in the Gospel of Matthew, and its meaning can be somewhat confusing to modern readers. However, by examining the context in which it is used, we can gain a better understanding of its significance in Matthew's gospel.

In Matthew's gospel, the word "mystery" is used to describe something that has been hidden or obscure but is now being revealed by Jesus Christ. For example, in Matthew 13:11, Jesus says, "The knowledge of the secrets of the kingdom of heaven has been given to you, but not to them." Here, the word "secrets" could also be translated as "mysteries," and it refers to the hidden truths about God's kingdom that Jesus is revealing to his disciples.

Another example of the use of the word "mystery" in Matthew's gospel is found in Matthew 16:17-19, where Jesus tells Peter, "Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by flesh and blood, but by my Father in heaven. And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not overcome it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven; whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven."

Here, Jesus is revealing a mystery to Peter about the nature of his church and its authority. The word "mystery" is used to describe the hidden truth that has been revealed to Peter by God.

In both of these examples, the word "mystery" is used to describe something that was previously hidden but is now being revealed by Jesus Christ. It refers to the hidden truths about God's kingdom that Jesus is revealing to his disciples and to the world.