What does it mean to have a humble and contrite spirit according to the Bible?

The concept of having a humble and contrite spirit is mentioned several times in the Bible. It is a fundamental aspect of the Christian faith and is considered an essential trait of a true believer. But what does it mean to have a humble and contrite spirit according to the Bible?

To understand this concept, we first need to define what it means to be humble. Humility is not about having a low opinion of oneself or thinking poorly of oneself. Rather, it is about having a realistic view of oneself and recognizing one's limitations. It is about acknowledging that everything we have comes from God and that we are nothing without Him.

A contrite spirit, on the other hand, is a spirit of repentance. It is a spirit that is broken and sorrowful over one's sin. It is a spirit that recognizes the gravity of sin and is willing to turn away from it and towards God.

In Isaiah 66:2, God says, "This is the one I esteem: he who is humble and contrite in spirit, and trembles at my word." This verse highlights the importance of having a humble and contrite spirit. It is not just something that is nice to have, but it is something that God esteems.

In Psalm 51:17, David says, "The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise." David understood the importance of having a contrite spirit. He knew that God values a heart that is broken over sin and willing to turn towards Him.

Having a humble and contrite spirit means recognizing our sinfulness and our need for God's grace. It means recognizing that we are nothing without Him and that everything we have comes from Him. It means being willing to repent of our sins and turn towards God.

Jesus himself exemplified humility and a contrite spirit. In Philippians 2:5-8, we read, "Your attitude should be the same as that of Christ Jesus: Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be grasped, but made himself nothing, taking the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness. And being found in appearance as a man, he humbled himself and became obedient to death—even death on a cross!" Jesus, who was God himself, humbled himself and became a servant. He was willing to die on the cross for our sins, demonstrating the ultimate act of humility and contrition.